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News: Discussion of psychoactive cacti and succulents

Author Topic: Astrophytum  (Read 6699 times)

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Offline Inyan

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Astrophytum
« on: February 02, 2015, 07:22:54 PM »
Just a taste of a few Astrophytum cultivars I've found on the web. http://www.cactusconservation.org/CCI/t2c_1.html
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2015, 11:49:20 PM »
that's a pretty cool resource.  I'm surprised there would be any confusion between lophs and astros though.  they seem so different to me.  hey correct me if I'm wrong but these look like they're grated to some type of euphorbia? 

Offline Inyan

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2015, 11:52:33 AM »
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2015, 12:12:55 PM »
thanks for clearing that up.  now i feel a bit dumb again.  i always just assumed they were euphorbia but never looked into it or poked one.  i would not have guessed this was dragon fruit.  the only hylocereus i've seen look way to spindly to support much. 

Offline Inyan

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2015, 01:35:55 PM »
Astrophytum asterias kikko nishiki hakabana feather petal hybridized by David Croce = pink petals.
A. asterias nudum kikko
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Offline Inyan

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2015, 01:41:42 PM »
Astrophora = Astrophytum asterias x Lophophora fricii

Now, what makes a cross such as this particularly interesting to me is that it opens up the doors to breeding in the many different traits seen in the genus Astrophytum into our Lophophora species and if done well... could result in a virtually pure species Lophophora with many of the exotic phenotypes seen in the Astrophytum.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2015, 10:27:19 PM »
that flower is pretty amazing

Offline Inyan

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Re: Astrophytum
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2015, 02:42:02 PM »
I agree, that flower is amazing. This is what I love about hybridizing. You can breed for larger flowers, showier flowers, different shapes, colors, etc. When I look at that flower and the fact that Lophophora can breed with this Genus I am thinking long term. What is possible to create and breed with just the Genus Lophophora? What is possible to create select for in terms of potency, flower, phenotype, etc. Now, when you consider that there are other Genus and species both which can breed with Astrophytum and Lophophora both you have to keep in mind your goals. If potency is a goal then this must be selected for as well. You also have to have those willing to share with you methods that they used to make these hybrids. Many hybrids are hard to make or need a bridge species to make a cross as they need a common cacti or plant in common to breed towards before they can be bred together. Some crosses may in the F1 generation not be spectacular or different at all and one may suspect that they have tricked the specimen into becoming self-fertile, but the F2 cross or further backcross may show some mixing of traits. For me, some of the Lophophora jourdaniana have some absolutely beautiful flowers while others seem not as remarkable. The bottom line is if your going to be serious in your hybridizing efforts you have to eventually either make what you are after using what is commonly available or you can speed up that process by buying the best genetics you can find that most closely resembles the goals you are after. The more you can rely on the progress already made by others the better, but sometimes you have to realize you may be on the cutting edge of something just by choosing to go after the particular goal you have chosen for yourself and as such there may not be any spectacular specimens you can go after to start your project. When that is the case, a superfluous amount of seed is a must as is a means for determining the traits you are going after. By growing out large numbers of seed from your own cross or someone else's you are able to begin to pay more attention to subtle differences in seedlings between crosses and eventually shorten your total grow out as you learn to be more differentiating in the crosses you make as well as in the selection of which seedlings you keep for growing up to full maturity. To me, it is an exciting process that can be a lifelong adventure as others take up the torch and begin to use your seedlings to improve their own lines and select for the traits they most desire. There is absolutely no reason that you can't dream of creating an active Astrophytum or a Lophophora that has traits absorbed from other species and yet is still surprisingly more active than anything one might find in the wild. With that said, it is imperative that someone breeding for a particular trait such as activity never consume or test the entire cacti. A small portion must always be saved for growing out and regrafting if only to be tested against other cacti later and under different growing conditions.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born