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Author Topic: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia  (Read 14869 times)

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Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2015, 02:40:43 AM »
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Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2015, 02:47:18 AM »
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Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2015, 02:50:42 AM »
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Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #18 on: February 27, 2015, 02:52:31 AM »
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Offline Inyan

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2015, 07:57:19 PM »
You are a brave soul indeed! Un-rooted cuts of Opuntia and seedling grafts as well! These can be tricky when done this way. You need to keep any these humid which means air tight and or humidity dome enclosure just to be on the safe side when you do them this way. For what its worth, there is always some play room and I'm giving  you an 80-90% success rate on these if you do nothing else. My best guess. There are two different schools of thought with this type of graft that I adhere to with Opuntia... the one you have already chosen... keep them humid, well wrapped, and warm. The other would be to submerge the cut ends of the Opuntia in wet sand or perlite with a humidity dome. Either way works fine. The latter seems to work better if the Opuntia is only growing slowly. If the Opuntia is growing a bit more rapidly and the temps can be kept higher as your doing... also works well. The real key is to keep these from drying out for the first two weeks or possibly a bit longer. When you do decide to remove the cling wrap my suggestion would be to place in a humidity dome with sand or perlite to root. Humidity domes for something like this can be a simple clear plastic bag with your cuttings/grafts inside and sealed up, two coat hangers cut in half and placed over your container in an arch and more cling wrap placed over them to make a mini green house... etc. You get the idea. You can even do a simple cup with moist perlite or sand and place them inside these with another clear cup placed over top of them to hold in the moisture.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2015, 11:54:59 PM »
what is the max time they can stay wrapped?  two weeks?  or until roots are poking out?  how about leaving them wrapped for 1 week then slowly unwrapping them and placing them into cactus soil in a humid tent?  they will be warm, yes. 

Offline Inyan

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2015, 11:46:32 AM »
I leave them wrapped like that for 1-2 weeks max. After that, I often simply remove and place in perlite or sand that is moist with a humidity dome or bag around that. The main benefit of the plastic wrap when used this way is its ability to hold the cutting down while also allowing the healing process to occur in a more humid environment. You simply do not want the recently cut surfaces to dry pulling away from each other. Sulfur dusting the bottoms prior to this can help.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Inyan

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2015, 11:58:40 AM »
Sorry I didn't notice this earlier, but P1020751.jpg  may have two of the seedlings (left and center) not connected properly. You can remedy this even now if they have not begun to dry. Simply push along the edge of the cling wrap to adjust them slightly outward and a bit closer to the outside of the cacti. Just a slight nudge should do it. Failing that, a simple cut in both the scion and the stock to remove a thin sliver of tissue should make it as new to begin again.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2015, 01:14:30 PM »
ok, thanks for the clarification.  i wonder if it is just because of the angle they are on?  some of the cuts i made were not quite 90 degrees so I'm wondering (hoping) if they might just appear to be tilted.  i tried to press them down and slide them around the stickiness.  they seemed flush, but some were on an angle.  i tried to make straight cuts but it turns out these DO have glochids… very, very small ones…so i had a few pairs of gloves on which made it difficult to make straight cuts.  thanks though, i will double check for sure.

Offline Inyan

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2015, 07:11:35 PM »
I see what you mean when you mention the angle. It never hurts to double check and after triple checking I think you are right!!! Lol, sorry to get you worried for nothing.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2015, 12:49:16 AM »
that's alright.  i was pretty bummed out for second there.  good thing you told me to check though….  i sprayed the container before i closed it..but like a dummy.. i didn't ensure they were up off the base of the thing.  a couple sat in water overnight and don't look to hot.  they got wet under the saran. 

Offline Inyan

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2015, 08:00:26 PM »
If they got sufficiently wet, you may want to unwrap them to protect them from fungus. Let those that got too wet dry a bit, but when dry place back in humidity dome. Do not attempt to put cling wrap back on those that got wet where you had to remove it. That decision is a tricky one to make, but suffice it to say that fungi can sometimes creep in or germinate when too wet. The other option is to simply keep an eye out for any abnormal growth signs such as black or white dots forming. A very light dusting of sulfur can often help with this if you apply it to the cut surfaces being careful not to dislodge the scions in the process. Another good lesson to be learned is that if you ever notice any discoloration such as red spots, etc. in your stock or scions tissue itself it is better to cut it off and remove it rather than chance it infecting the rest of your stock/scions once they have been cut and opened up to possible infections. This is why many will clean their blades with alcohol after each cut. So as not to cross contaminate other cacti. I confess, I usually just use water... but I've also had the backfire on me before and ruined a whole batch of grafts. In an ideal world, I'd do everything right and to the best of my ability each and every time, but in the real world things happen. We get in a rush or overly excited about making grafts and after so many successes you think... now I've got it! Lol, that is usually when the bad stuff happens. Don't beat yourself up over it.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2015, 11:34:31 PM »
thanks man.  yeah i fudged up a bit there.  i carefully unwrapped a few and rewrapped them.  the others i left in an area with high air flow to dry out.  I'm sure some of them are done for so that will be the cost of that simple lesson.  i really didn't think that much water came out when i misted the container.  you know, i've heard people talking about using alcohol after each cut and always wonder how much it really helps since bacteria and spores are in the air and on our hands so inevitably they will populate the area.  I'm also pretty sure their is healthy flora for plants too.  i have been giving it a quick wipe and flame myself.  i definitely know i have a lot of mistakes yet to make.  it's the foreseeable ones that i upset me.  this could have easily been avoided with just another moment of consideration. 

Offline Inyan

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2015, 12:37:57 PM »
I agree with your sentiments on bacteria and fungi. I've actually grown out anaerobes, aerobes, fungi, etc. on agar media I've created and on store bought media as well and you absolutely must develop some good techniques to preventing contamination. Your breath can stir up microorganisms in the air and easily contaminate things. With that said, I'm with you. There is only so much you can do when grafting. The hardest part is maintaining a humid warm environment and hoping some of the normal flora in the environment does not contaminate your grafts. Its a gentle balance that you have to keep and even then everyone has mishaps from time to time. One of my grafting attempts for instance failed.... simply because I failed to act properly on what I saw as insect damage. If I had of examined the hole the insect made and thought about it more... I would have realized that the insect that made the whole most likely continued to defecate while winding its way around the inside of the cacti. Like a fool, I noticed the red streaks in the cacti and simply cut 98% of it away and grafted a slew of cacti at the same time without properly cleaning. Needless to say, I should have cut 110% of it away to be on the safe side and sterilized if not simply used a new blade. We all learn from these mistakes. The one thing I know for certain is that if you have a doubt about what something is... it is often best to simply cut it out and presume it to be a pathogen of some sort. With that said, I think your going to like grafting with Opuntia. Opuntia sets up a nice root system that is much more forgiving than Lophophora's roots and another benefit is that you can cut the stock after you have some decent growth leaving just a wedge of Opuntia stock for rerooting your already grafted Lophophora. The place where you cut the wedge out... becomes another surface already rooted for your next graft. Some people call that hidden grafting, but you can be assured that you don't need a huge cacti for stock. What is more important is the rooting characteristics of the stock in the long run. You can have a good number of grafts from a single Opuntia pad this way and all your grafted scions (Lophophora) will have the roots of Opuntia nicely hidden under them and concealed.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Chief BigTittyFlapFlaps

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Re: next attempt at grafting lophophora to opuntia
« Reply #29 on: March 04, 2015, 03:48:08 PM »
..so the worry is that something might colonize the space between the scion and the stock?  it seems that is the only part that needs to remain sterile and mainly from anaerobes, which likely aren't on your cutting surfaces.  is that right? 

i like the idea of hiding the stock in the case of opuntia, pereskiopsis and hylocereus but as for the blue candle i definitely want to use the entire stock to really add to the look. 

what kind of insect tunnelled through your plant like that?