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News: Discussion of psychoactive cacti and succulents

Author Topic: Food for thought  (Read 671 times)

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Offline Inyan

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For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born

Offline Inyan

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Re: Food for thought
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2017, 08:18:05 PM »
Elsevier   
Biological Psychiatry
Volume 58, Issue 8, 15 October 2005, Pages 624-631
Biological Psychiatry
Original article
Psychological and Cognitive Effects of Long-Term Peyote Use Among Native Americans
Author links open overlay panelJohn H.HalpernaAndrea R.SherwoodcJames I.HudsonaDeborahYurgelun-ToddbHarrison G.PopeJra
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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.06.038Get rights and content
Background

Hallucinogens are widely used, both by drug abusers and by peoples of traditional cultures who ingest these substances for religious or healing purposes. However, the long-term residual psychological and cognitive effects of hallucinogens remain poorly understood.

Methods

We recruited three groups of Navajo Native Americans, age 18–45: 1) 61 Native American Church members who regularly ingested peyote, a hallucinogen-containing cactus; 2) 36 individuals with past alcohol dependence, but currently sober at least 2 months; and 3) 79 individuals reporting minimal use of peyote, alcohol, or other substances. We administered a screening interview, the Rand Mental Health Inventory (RMHI), and ten standard neuropsychological tests of memory and attentional/executive functions.

Results

Compared to Navajos with minimal substance use, the peyote group showed no significant deficits on the RMHI or any neuropsychological measures, whereas the former alcoholic group showed significant deficits (p < .05) on every scale of the RMHI and on two neuropsychological measures. Within the peyote group, total lifetime peyote use was not significantly associated with neuropsychological performance.
Conclusions

We found no evidence of psychological or cognitive deficits among Native Americans using peyote regularly in a religious setting. It should be recognized, however, that these findings may not generalize to illicit hallucinogen users.
For those that graft...
Every areole is a cactus waiting to be born